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Food Bank For New York City

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Who We Help


In New York City, 1 in 5 people rely on the Food Bank For New York City’s programs and services to keep food on the table. Among the 1.4 million New Yorkers who rely on soup kitchens and food pantries, women, children, seniors, the working poor and people with disabilities make up the largest groups. Facing challenges such as low wages, unemployment and healthcare costs, these groups are particularly vulnerable to food poverty. We hope that you will take a moment to read through and meet a few of the New Yorkers whom your support helps.

 

Women     Children     Seniors     The Working Poor     People with Disabilities

 

Women

  • Among women in NYC, 34 percent experienced difficulty affording food in 2012 — up 21 percent since 2003. (NYC Hunger Experience 2012)
  • Almost two thirds of New Yorkers visiting food pantries are women (64 percent). (NYC Hunger Safety Net 2007)
  • More than 1 out of every 4 women in NYC (24 percent) would not be able to afford needed food immediately after losing their household income. (NYC Hunger Experience 2012)

Meet women we help:
Linda >
Susan >

 



Children

Our Approach to Child Hunger
Recognizing the severity of child hunger in our city, Food Bank employs a multi-pronged approach to ending this problem, including food distribution, nutrition education and income support for families with children.  Learn More >

 

Meet families with children:
John >

Wendy >

 



Seniors

  • More than 1 in 4 seniors in NYC (28 percent) experienced difficulty affording needed food in 2010 — a 22 percent increase since 2003. (NYC Hunger Experience 2012)
  • Approximately 1 in 6 elderly New Yorkers (nearly 154,000) receives food from soup kitchens and food pantries. (NYC Hunger Safety Net 2007)
  • Almost 1 in 5 seniors in NYC (19 percent) lives below the federal poverty level. (US Census Bureau, American Community Survey 2011)
  • 16% of New York City residents ages 65 and older reported paying for medicine or medical care instead of food. 

Our approach to Senior Hunger

Senior_Program_Our_Programs_box picThrough our Food Program Network, Food Bank serves seniors across the city – nearly one third of soup kitchen and food pantry users' households contain someone 65 or older (NYC Hunger Experience 2012).  We also serve seniors directly, with nutritious food, creative activities, and access to a full complement of services at the Neighborhood Center for Adults 60+ program at our Harlem Community Kitchen & Soup Pantry.

Meet seniors we help:

Moses >

 

 



The Working Poor

  • More than 1 in 5 (21 percent) NYC residents standing in line at soup kitchens and food pantries are employed; among them, 57 percent work full time. (NYC Hunger Safety Net 2007)
  • Even though they were working, 54 percent of employed NYC residents experienced difficulty affording needed food in 2012. (NYC Hunger Experience 2012)
  • The average income for NYC households accessing emergency food that have employed members is $1,507 per month. (NYC Hunger Safety Net 2007)

Meet the working New Yorkers we help:
Betty >
Wendy >

 



People with Disabilities

  • Almost one third (31 percent) of disabled adults in NYC live below the federal poverty level. (US Census Bureau, American Community Survey 2008)
  • More than 1 in 5 (22 percent) NYC residents turning to soup kitchens and food pantries receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and 6 percent receive Social Security Disability Income (SSDI). (NYC Hunger Safety Net 2007)
  • On average, NYC residents who access emergency food and are enrolled in Supplemental Security Income (SSI) receive $647 per month. (NYC Hunger Safety Net 2007)

Meet people with disabilities we help:
Hector >
Moses >

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